Tuesday, 21 January 2014

White Scars Spartan Assault Tank Part 2

Hello all!

Macca again, this time I'm here with part 2 of my spartan WIP for my White Scars. First off the bat, we have the left side of the tank. You can see here that the decal for the White Scars has been placed central on the door. It has then been varnished to keep it on the tank, then sponged gently with white, not too much, or else it will be too diluted. This gives it the appearance of damage and chipping. Note that the door frame is chipped all around, to do this well, you need to do the door separate to the rest of the tank, or else you will smear the paint and it won't look right.


This is the left side sponson shroud. Again, it has been chipped at, all with a sponge. The idea here is that only the edges of panels are chipped. People often make the mistake of chipping a flat surface, this isn't how it works in real life, and it doesn't look right. Do a web search for battle damage and you'll see how far some go. That's not to say don't do it if it suits you, just be mindful that it isn't realistic.


The right side is much the same, a little more damaged, for no other reason then to keep the tank from having too much symmetry. I have used a heavily diluted oil wash, again, my mix of green, brown and black, to create my 'grease', I have then gone and put it on every rivet and into most panel lines. This helps to define the shape of the tank, as well as breaking up the plain white. There is one really important point to note here, and that is DON'T WASH THE WHOLE TANK! This is again, something the internet is very bad for in tutorials and the like. Doing that will actually blend the wash into the panels, meaning all you're doing is making the whole tank darker, rather then creating contrast. Also, it leaves big dribble marks often.

So, this is where we are at. The next step in this build is the weapon systems and the tracks (gulp), tune in in the next day or so, and I will have that post up and ready. Catch.

6 comments:

  1. More great stuff mate. Ive heard the tracks on this bugger can be a bit of a faff on to get to fit.

    On chipping, is there a process you use to decide what colour to use as your chipping colour? I ask only as I am currently working on some Ultramarines which I fancied adding chipping too but was leery of mussing them up if I picked the wrong chip colour. Any thoughts on how you would tackle it?

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  2. Ok, well, to be honest the tracks are a nightmare, more of that in the 3rd or 4th post, but I almost resort to name calling. Chipping needs to compliment the colour, I will be doing a blog towards the end of the week describing chipping in various colours, as I know a fair few people have issues. The important info is don't overload, don't go for metallic off the bat, and choose shades of the colour you're based on, such as dark greys on white, blacks and whites on greys, and over-touched, that is to say, one colour super-imposed over another for bright colours.

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    1. Cheers James - I'll keep my eye out for the chipping post.

      Again cracking stuff from you and the other lads.

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  3. Nice work mate, did you get some of the track inserts from John? Or are you going to do the plasticard route like I did?

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    1. I honestly thought about the track inserts, in the end I kept it plain, although I have the goods to cast my own ones, I decided to keep it as it comes. I love the MK IV tanks from WWI and I based the tracks paint job on those, which almost makes them look realistic. The killer was having to cut links off to get them to fit.

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